Tag Archives: respite

Visit to a Respite Care Home for Autistic Adults

Just typing those words seems wrong. A ‘care home’ makes me thinks of old people sitting around in mis-matched armchairs gazing blankly into space. I know that’s not what all care homes are like – I visited half a dozen not so long ago when looking for accommodation for an elderly great-aunt – but that is the image that is conjured up in my mind.

In reality, of course, the care home is not like that at all. Far from it. After a drive of 45 minutes on a bright, sunny day I found myself at a large, detached Edwardian villa on the outskirts of a seaside town. It had been adapted to provide accommodation for up to 7 young adults on the autistic spectrum.

My overall impression was of a light, spacious house which consisted of: a communal lounge containing comfy sofas and armchairs for watching TV; an adjoining dining area equipped with several small tables and chairs where guests (or – as they have to be referred to by council staff – ‘service users’) could take their meals; a sensory room; a computer room; a communal kitchen where guests are encouraged to make their own drinks and join in with the preparation of meals; a wetroom and 3 ground floor bedrooms suitable for use by those with mobility issues. Upstairs were a further 4 bedrooms all with their own washbasins; a separate shower room and a bathroom.

Outside the garden was large with lawned areas, a pond, a summerhouse, seating areas, mature trees and flowerbeds: perfect for Harry’s obsession with sticks! I could easily envisage him pottering around quite happily in the sunshine.

We spent a great deal of time discussing Harry’s individual likes and dislikes, routines and behaviour. It seemed to me that staff would endeavour to accommodate Harry’s interests wherever possible. Activities available included Wii, computer games, DVDs, jenga, jigsaws, board games and barbecues. The home is located within walking distance of several pubs and shops and Harry would be able to go to the cinema if he wished.

At several points during the discussion I found myself getting quite emotional as staff commented on how lovely Harry sounded and that they were looking forward to meeting him. They expressed surprise that we hadn’t accessed respite care for him before. As I explained how easy-going and laid back Harry was I found myself wondering the same thing.

Although there were seven rooms these were not all occupied all the time so the mix of people would change over the course of the fortnght. In August, when Harry would be staying, we discovered that he would know several of the other guests who had been recent leavers from his current school. It was good to know that he would see some familiar faces whilst ‘on holiday’.

In my research I had found that the weekly cost of a stay at the home in 2009 was £233 so when we finally discussed costs it was with some relief that I learned Harry’s funding package from Adult Services would easily cover his stay.

By the end of my visit 2 hours later my mind had been put at ease. We agreed on a series of familiarisation visits starting with a Sunday afternoon trip in a few weeks’ time. In short, I was so taken with the place I’d have happily booked myself in and you can’t say better than that!

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Researching Respite Care for Autistic Adults

This is a big deal for us. We have never had proper respite care; by which I mean anything other than a family member looking after Harry in our absence.

But this year – for the first time ever – we are going on holiday without Harry. Last year’s annual holiday wasn’t exactly a disaster but it wasn’t much of a break either. And Harry is singularly unimpressed with the idea of holidays: he doesn’t like water so swimming is a no-no; he’s not happy in sunshine and he can’t read – well, what else do you do if you’re sitting around a pool or on the beach? What he wanted to do all week was sit in the hotel room watching films on the portable DVD player. And he can do that just about anywhere…

Now that our daughter is nearly fifteen we realise there won’t be many more occasions when she’ll want to holiday with us…. So, this year, Harry is having a week’s holiday away with the school and then later in the year the three of us are having a fortnight together in South Africa.

While we are away Harry needs somewhere to stay. He had his first Needs Assessment by social services last year and it meant that I also had a Carer’s Assessment (all in one home visit). At the end of the assessment I was asked if we’d ever had any respite care – we hadn’t – and would we like some?

That took some thinking about. Our methodology to date had been: we can cope. Harry’s behaviour is relatively easy to handle and we had rarely sought any help or intervention. But our parents are getting elderly and have health & mobility problems of their own and they won’t be around as backup forever.

So this week I am going to check out what respite care is on offer to see whether it will meet Harry’s needs. I’m not at all sure what to expect. I have checked out the care home’s inspection report which is excellent and sounds ideal: it has an accreditation from the National Autistic Society (NAS) and caters specifically for up to 7 young adults on the spectrum.

But two weeks is a long time and my stomach flips when I think about leaving him for so long. If I feel like this at the thought of a fortnight apart how will I feel if/when he goes off to residential college for up to six weeks at a time?