Accessing & Assessing Social Activities for Autistic Adults

Today I made the difficult decision to cancel one of Harry’s two weekly social activities.

For the last few months Harry has been going to his school’s Youth Club which takes place on a weekday evening from 6pm till 8pm. His attendance was suggested by a member of the Adult Services team who attended Harry’s Statement of SEN review in January and we were very grateful for the opportunity to extend Harry’s social activities. (Up until that point I didn’t even know that school ran a youth club even though he’s been attending this school for 18mths).

Perhaps our distance from school meant teachers thought we wouldn’t be interested. His school is a 45 minute drive from where we live so, in order to attend, various other support processes would have to be set up. For instance it would be pointless in Harry going if it meant that we would have to take him and bring him back. So, Adult Services suggested that they could arrange for a worker from MENCAP to collect Harry at the end of the school day, walk with him to the nearby community centre where Harry could access their tea-time service, and then accompany him back to school for the start of Youth Club.

In order to avoid the hour & a half round trip to collect Harry at the end of Youth Club we decided to ask his school taxi company to provide that service – at an additional cost to us of £30 a time. When I discussed the possibility of Adult Services covering the cost within his ‘funding package’ I was told that Harry was in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and that this was what DLA was intended to cover. So be it! On top of that we also had to find the cost of his tea at the community centre, a further £2.60. Again, that seemed reasonable enough if it meant that Harry was getting the chance to interact with his peers, and perhaps even making a few friends.

Harry started going to Youth Club a few months ago. But I soon heard from people who saw him at the tea time service that he looked a bit lost, sat on his own and didn’t join in with activities. And, although Harry isn’t the most talkative of people, it seemed to us that all he really seemed to do at Youth Club was watch films. Admittedly, this is one of his favourite activities but it didn’t seem to us to be a particularly ‘social’ activity and we expressed doubts at to the value of his attendance.

Last week those attending Youth Club took advantage of the warm weather and walked to a local pond where they fed the ducks. This made a nice change from sitting indoors watching films but at a cost of £32.60 a week we felt it was time to acknowledge that it wasn’t making the best use of Harry’s DLA.

So, today I called Adult Services, explained the situation and asked them to cancel the support work provided by MENCAP. They were very understanding and told me that, in the meantime, they had been in touch with Action For Children to see whether they could offer any activities that Harry could access.

Until then, Harry is back down to one social activity a week…

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One response to “Accessing & Assessing Social Activities for Autistic Adults

  1. Services need to be individualised so that they can be both appropriate and effective for those receiving them. Parents and young adults keep saying this but no one seems to be listening. Disability is not a one size fits all experience yet support services continue to operate as if that were true. I feel for your families frustration with it all.

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