The End of Statements

Last week I attended a Pathfinder workshop on the government’s green paper into the future of the assessment process for children with Special Educational Needs & Disabilities (SEND).

It was entitled “A new way to help young adults to plan what they [sic] want for their future: a single assessment process and one ‘Education, Health and Care Plan’ bringing together support for children and young people from birth to 25, and focusing on better life outcomes beyond school or college.”

You will notice that this title mentions ‘young adults’ and it became clear that the primary focus was on school leavers in the area aged 16 plus. It may be that other workshops focus their attention on other age groups and I would urge parents to find out if there is a workshop in their area and attend in order to make their views known.

The government tender to run these workshops was won by Preparing for Adulthood and the one I went to was attended by about 30 people, mostly from the education, health & social care organisations in the area. They included deputy head teachers of Special Schools, staff from Further Education Colleges, representatives of council departments and careers advisers but noticeably few parents. Although some parents attended under the auspices of the local Parents & Carers Forum (PACF) I counted only two independent parents/carers, of whom I was one.

It was made clear from the outset that what goes into the new bill to reform SEN assessments will be informed by what comes out of these pathfinder workshops. There is a sense of urgency to reform and so this new Single Plan is going to come into being quite quickly. However, quickly in legislative terms (2014) turns out to be not so quick for those children/young adults and their families who are desperate to get some sort of plan in place now!

This new document will replace the Statement of Special Educational Needs. The intention is that it will be formulated by the young person and their family and then relevant bodies will have to work out how best to meet that person’s needs. If anyone has ever been involved in Person Centred Reviews or Person Centred Planning then the new document will follow that sort of format.

The government is looking to learn from previous programmes which you may (or in my case, may not) have heard of, including: Transition Support Programme, Getting a Life and Valuing Employment Now. It will also build in elements of existing documents including the Statement of SEN, the Learning for Living and Work Framework and the various needs assessments questionnaires.

During the course of the day we worked through topics such as:

  • What is your vision for SEND young adults in the area?
  • What is working and not working now?
  • The Single Plan: do person-centred planning questions help?
  • What should the next steps be after today?

Of course, as is the tendency with most of these type of events, those in attendance have their own particular agendas. They all want to keep their jobs, their departments and, most importantly, their budgets. However, what will change in future is that there will be joint commissioning, hence references to the ‘Single Assessment’, ‘Single Plan’ and the ‘Education, Health & Care Plan’ in which all services currently engaged in supporting a young person will have to work together.

I have to say that, although we were few in number, parents’ voices were heard (loudly and with some emotion) and our opinions noted.  We were all of the mind that we wanted our children to have the opportunity to attend residential colleges. Whereas local day colleges give students the chance to role-play life skills; only colleges with a residential aspect give students the chance to put those life skills into daily practice in a meaningful way.

If for no other reason, such events are useful opportunities to meet those people whose decisions directly affect your child. For example, I talked to teachers from Harry’s past and present special schools, managed to bend the ear of his Connexions advisor and made contact with members of the adult disability services team. I would advise any parent to do the same. Get your face and name known, along with that of your child.

I hope it was enough…

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3 responses to “The End of Statements

  1. I was interested in your Case Study article in yesterdays Guardian newspaper. You may be interested to know that FiND charity in East Yorkshire has just opened a Day Service for people 16+ who have autisitic spectrum disorder and associated learning difficulties (due to the lack of local provision). We have a fully equipped life skills training flat and are funded through people’s personal budgets; offering individual learning programmes. We are OfSTED registered and offer AQA accredited programmes. Feel free to get in touch and visit us if appropriate

    • Thank you for getting in touch Jayne. I wasn’t aware of your service, possibly because we are in North Yorkshire rather than East Yorkshire. I have had a look at your website and it looks like you offer great alternatives for people in that part of the county.
      However, it is over an hour’s drive from where we live and we are not on any public transport routes which is where Harry’s potential use of a Day Service runs into difficulties.
      I will post a link to your website on the blog as I’m sure it will be very useful to others.

      • Thank you for your reply and for putting a link to our website on your ‘blog’. This is really helpful. As a small charity we try hard to market and network our services but this is a bit of a challenge sometimes. One of our parents may be in touch too. Her son who is autistic was being transported to Wakefiled on a daily basis before we opened the service in Hessle. Her experiences chime with yours and I mentioned your blog to her. Good luck in finding the appropriate service for your son. Kind regards.

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